RaceRoundUp: 2018 Diamond States Masters Regatta

As frequently can be trouble during the hot and humid summers in the DC/Maryland/Virginia area, Diamond States brought with it some bad summer storms. But per usual, it also brought about some great racing!

Check out the official results from Diamond State Masters Regatta, and explore the Capital finishes below:

  • 01A. MEN’S E-J 1X – LTW – 8:30AM – FINAL: 1st, B. Reichart
  • 05C. MEN’S F 1X – 9:33AM – FINAL: 4th M. Malinick
  • 06B. WOMEN’S E-J 1X – 9:47AM – FINAL: 4th A. Diggs
  • 07B. MIXED AA-C 2X – 10:08AM – FINAL: 2nd, R.Hollins
  • 09C. MEN’S E 1X – 10:57AM – FINAL: 3rd, G. Dean
  • 15B. MEN’S E-F 2X – 12:14PM – FINAL: 4th, M. Malinick
  • 16. WOMEN’S AA-B 2X – 12:21PM – FINAL: 1st, S. Acerra
  • 37A. MEN’S E-J 4+ – 8:49AM – FINAL: 1st & 3rd
  • 37C. MEN’S E-J 4+ – 9:03AM – FINAL: 1st
  • 40A. WOMEN’S B 4+ – 9:38AM – FINAL: 2nd & 3rd
  • 40B. WOMEN’S B 4+ – 9:45AM – FINAL: 1st & 4th
  • 41. MIXED D-J 8+ – 9:52AM – FINAL: 1st
  • 43A. MIXED AA-J 4X – 10:06AM – FINAL: 4th
  • 43B. MIXED AA-J 4X – 10:13AM – FINAL: 2nd
  • 44A. MEN’S B 4+ – 10:20AM – FINAL: 3rd & 4th
  • 44B. MEN’S B 4+ – 10:27AM – FINAL: 3rd
  • 45A. WOMEN’S AA-A 4+ – 10:34AM – FINAL: 3rd
  • 45B. WOMEN’S AA-A 4+ – 10:41AM – FINAL: 1st
  • 46A. WOMEN’S C 8+ – 10:48AM – FINAL: 4th
  • 46B. WOMEN’S C 8+ – 10:55AM – FINAL: 2nd
  • 47B. WOMEN’S D-J 4X – 11:09AM – FINAL: 3rd
  • 57A. MIXED AA-C 8+ – 12:54PM – FINAL: 2nd & 3rd
  • 57B. MIXED AA-C 8+ – 1:01PM – FINAL: 1st & 4th
  • 58A. MEN’S D 4+ – 1:08PM – FINAL: 1st
  • MEN’S AA-C 4X – 1:22PM – FINAL: 4th
  • 60A. WOMEN’S C 4+ – 1:29PM – FINAL: 2nd & 5th
  • 60B. WOMEN’S C 4+ – 1:36PM – FINAL: 2nd
  • 61B. MEN’S E-J 8+ – 1:50PM – FINAL: 2nd
  • 62. MEN’S C 4+ – 1:57PM – FINAL: 4th
  • 64A. WOMEN’S AA-B 8+ – 2:25PM – FINAL: 2nd & 4th
  • 64B. WOMEN’S AA-B 8+ – 2:32PM – FINAL: 2nd
     

30for30: The Old Boathouse or Down Under the 11th Street Bridge

By: Sarah Dunham, Jeff Loftus, and Jen Ney, collated by Lily Elsner

July 9, 2010 was an important day in Capital’s history – the day that the first Anacostia Community Boathouse, home to our shells, was demolished. For more tenured members of the club, the day marked an end of an era, that newer members cannot recall, as evidence of Capital’s former homes have been erased. For context, from March 1995 until March 2002, Capital found its first independent home under the 11th Street Bridge. From 2002 to July 2010, the club moved next door to 1115 O Street SE. Prior to the first Anacostia Community Boathouse’s demolition, Capital moved to its current home at 1900 M Street SE, in the second Anacostia Community Boathouse.  A few members of the club who recall those good old early days kindly shared those recollections, and many pictures, so that we all can revel in Capital’s history.   

“Before we got access to the old War Department Buildings located at 1115 O Street SE and converted one into a boat storage building and the other into a erg and functional training space,” said Jen Ney, “all Capital had was two fenced-in compounds. We rowed used boats.  Many of our wood racks were built by local Boy Scouts. We had one portable toilet and a small shed for storing tools and cox boxes. We strung lights and our only overhead shelter were the spans of the 11th St Bridge. When you were putting away oars, you had to watch for pooping pigeons hovering above. (Just ask Chris Erling.)” Jeff Loftus also recalled this fine feature of the 11th Street Bridge Boathouse. He and Tom Chaleki applied several coats of marine-grade varnish on the club’s ancient wooden Pocock shells – Jack Barrett and Cliff Johnson in the “dungeon”—the vault/hollow bridge support that was home to Capital’s boats during the winter months and to pigeons year round.

Jen also shared that under the bridge, Model B ergs were stored under a tarp. Erg tests were taken under the bridge with the noise of cars speeding overhead.  Over the winter, we stored our shells inside the bridge abutments. The D.C. Department of Transportation actually allowed us to go inside the massive abutments and store equipment inside the bridge footings. To enter, we had to remove riggers, hunch down and carry boats on your head through a small, narrow door. It was all very primitive but we had fun.

In 2002, the “old” Boathouse was “new digs,” according to Jeff. Built and operated by the Department of War to develop and test amphibious assault craft back in the 1940s, in preparation for D-Day, the building was transferred to D.C. in the mid-century. Then, the D.C. Department of Public Works operated out of the building and stored their private boats and lawnmowers there, when we were invited to the site in 1993 to hold novice classes for adults and kids by OARS (Organization of Anacostia and Sculling).   Jeff shared additional color. “After we gained access to the building, an early item of great discussion and hand-wringing was the bathroom and toilet in the back corner. Fortunately, we has some very able members who were in the Navy who installed a brand new toilet and fixed some of the plumbing. I think it was Sarah Dachos who pulled it off.”

Lots of Capital blood and sweat went into the new Boathouse. Jeff continued, “Steve Vermillion went through 3 hammers building oar racks with wood lying around the site, and bashed his thumb in the process.  He also laid several cobblestones that Bob Day had scavenged from everywhere (probably Princess Street in Old Town) on a wet area in the corner of our outside racks under the bridge. I recall that we had a devil of a time getting the three roll-up doors installed;  Carl Cole came through for us yet again. Carl was our patron saint looking over us back then.”

Sarah Dunham shared a very fond memory from 2002, when Masters Nationals was hosted on the Occoquan, so Capital rowers didn’t need to travel.  “We as a club invited Coach Guennadi Bratichko’s former rowing club from Moscow, Dynamo, to come to Masters Nationals. We had just that summer gotten access to the building, but had not yet moved all our shells into it.  So we hosted a dinner in the new-to-us building for all Capital and Dynamo rowers. It was a great (and somewhat wild) celebration of the new building, masters nationals, and the really neat experience of meeting and hosting the rowers from Dynamo.”

The strong spirit of Capital, regardless of the home of our boats and workouts, was present throughout the life of the club. Sarah also shared a memory which she says “really showcases the resilience of the club and strong leadership when we were rowing from under the bridge (before we had access to the building that became our boathouse for a while).” In 2001, the entire club – not once, but twice – had to pick up its entire operations and move to Bladensburg for a period of time.  The first time was over the summer and there was a creosote spill (caused by construction of those buildings that are now along M Street) that contaminated the area around our docks. While that was being remediated, under Jim Connolly’s leadership we moved all the operations of the club to the boathouse in Bladensburg and ran practices from up there. Later, after September 11, the part of the river where we were rowing was “closed” for a period of time and we again moved all the operations up to Bladensburg.  Can you imagine now needing to move the entire operations of Capital to a different site without missing any water time (yes, the club is bigger now, but we still had multiple programs and a lot of equipment back then)?

While countless stories are left unwritten, these few remind us that while places are special, the people of the club matter most. While we heartily enjoy the tales of past, the boathouses hosted our stories. When asked about the boathouses, Jen mentioned meeting her husband, Ralph, and Jeff mentioned a precious memory of a baby pool in the boathouse and two of his girls (now teenagers) were just toddlers at the time, splashing away.  Steve Vermillion and his toddler son jumped in as well, as did Jim Connolly with Carston. While the Club has seen that bricks, bridges, tarps, and steel can build a boathouse, Capital shows that the crucial element of the boathouse is its people.

30for30: Capital Adaptive, from the Beginning

By Chuck Linderman

The Capital Adaptive Rowing Program had its first year of practice and competition in 2009. Of that early group of rowers there are but three members of Capital still with the group: Joe Tezak, Chuck Linderman, and Charlie Lenneman. None of the original coaches or Capital volunteers from that early time are with the program with the lone exception of our volunteer extraordinaire: Bob Lenneman, who brings and rows with Charlie and also brings Chuck Linderman. This is a reflection not on the coaches, but rather the intensity of personnel requirements to run a successful adaptive rowing program and the adversities that each participant must overcome to be successful.

One thing is very different for CARP in 2018: continuity in the coaching staff from year to year. And continuity from one coaching year to the next is highly important for adaptive rowers. All of our athletes have been classified by medical professionals who understand the FISA classification system for adaptive rowers. It is important for competitive purposes that this be done fairly, because it seems as though each adaptive athlete brings his or her own set of variabilities to an adaptive regatta. Our program includes single and double amputees, stroke victims, college athletic injuries, blindness, and degenerative end-of-life challenges. All of these are included in our program and all of them have medaled in the Bayada Regatta in Philadelphia.

Our first head coach was Patrick Johnson with assistance from Mike Curtis. This was before the new boathouse opened in 2010. Patrick and Mike operated in the classic manner of crew coaches and did not hesitate to push the rowers as necessary. The results for that first year of competition were inspiring to all.

In subsequent years, a variety of coaches, each with their individual style, have come and gone through CARP. Those coaches who have had the most success have had strong volunteer coordinators. Our current volunteer coordinator, Michele Woolbert is responsible for much of CARP’s success. She makes the boat assignments and determines which volunteers can pair up with which rowers. It is more of an art than a science. Sometimes, if CARP is short of volunteers, some adaptive rowers will go and erg, though this is not the best solution.

Without our loving and unselfish volunteers, CARP would not be successful, let alone competitive on a national scale. The primary things the volunteers do are:

  1. Be a rowing partner for someone in a double, which usually means the volunteer steering the boat from the bow seat;
  2. Carrying boats down to the dock from the storage bay and rigging area;
  3. Helping put away boats after the rowers return.

Results from the Bayada Regatta in Philadelphia each August are the standard by which CARP measures success. It is truly a powerful spectacle to watch people with various challenges get into or placed into a boat for a race and see the results. It inspires everyone who is at St. John’s Boathouse that weekend in August.

As we stand on the banks of the Anacostia at the beginning of June 2018, CARP has its first new double, is scheduling in shifts on Saturdays. In order to get everyone on the water, with our limited number of seats, CARP is now splitting into two practices on Saturdays and practicing on four weeknights.

How far we have come with the great and generous support from Capital!  We could not have done this, and continue without all of the supportive people at Capital.   

RaceResults Round Up: Robert E Day Jr Capital Sprints 2018

Thanks everyone for the great racing at the Robert E Day Jr Capital Sprints!

Results have been posted here: http://www.capitalrowing.org/crcwp/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Robert-E.-Day-Jr.-Capital-Sprints-2018-all-results-chronological.pdf

If you have any questions, stories you’d like to share or photos from the day — please don’t hesitate to reach out to the Regatta Director via email capsprints@capitalrowing.org

See you this fall for Head of the Anacostia and next year at Robert E Day Jr CapSprints 2019!

30for30: Honoring Bob Day

By Leah Krynicky, 30th Anniversary Committee Co-Chair

You may have noticed an exciting new change to Capital’s summer regatta. In honor of the Anacostia rowing and paddling community’s most committed and hardworking champion, we are officially christening the Robert E. Day, Jr. Capital Sprints.

Bob Day had a lifelong passion for crew, and we have Bob to thank for every stroke we take on the Anacostia. In fact, every person who takes a stroke—whether from a shell, dragon boat, or canoe—on our stretch of the river has Bob to thank.

Bob Day had a vision to bring rowing to the Anacostia. Following his retirement, Bob founded the Organization for Anacostia Rowing and Sculling (OARS) in 1988, introducing students from Anacostia Senior High School and Frederick Douglass Junior High School to rowing.

Capital Rowing Club began as a community rowing organization the same year, originally rowing out of Thompson’s Boat Center on the Potomac River. In need of more space, Capital was looking for a new home in 1995, and OARS invited us to join them on the Anacostia. We began our decades-long partnership with Bob based on our mutual love of rowing and our dedication to making it accessible to all in the community.

Along with OARS and two other organizations, Capital became a founding member of the Anacostia Community Boathouse Association (ACBA). In 2010, Capital and other members of ACBA moved to our current site from which we train and compete. Bob remained active in the ACBA community, often accompanied to the boathouse by his best friend and wife Diana.

Capital’s sprint regatta began fourteen years ago as a scrimmage among cross-town rivals and has grown into a summer racing tradition for rowing teams all over the DC area and up and down the East Coast. Each year, more than 200 youth and adult athletes with various abilities compete in more than 30 rowing categories during the daylong event.

Bob’s vision has led to a thriving community of more than 1,000 athletes of all ages and experience levels from 9 community, high school, and university programs. It is through his efforts that we all are able to challenge our physical and mental strength; experience the highs and lows of practices; build comradery and confidence through competition; and enjoy crisp mornings, hot afternoons, and beautiful sunrises and sunsets while rowing on the Anacostia.

The Capital community is honored to fondly call Bob Day a friend, and we are proud to remember him each year at the Robert E. Day, Jr. Capital Sprints regatta.