Capital Rowing Club

Weekly information on the Sunday morning practice plan and general information for SAW rowers.

      SAWTeamPC 

2015 SAW Coaches 

Head Coach, TBD

Bob Brady  brady.robert1 at gmail.com    

SAW Program Co-reps   

Jim Smailes     jasmailes at gmail.com         

Mary Ellsworth   marysellsworth at gmail.com


 SAW Program workouts start at 7:00 AM on Sundays.  Plan to arrive by 6:55 and be ready to stretch and start line-ups at 7:00.    We plan to be off the water by 9 AM, and then rack the boats, clean up, etc..  

Weather note:  Come on down to the river, rain or shine.  We'll have some erg fun if we can't get out on the water.

blueberry muffin coffee
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After rowing, SAW goes for coffee!  

    Join us at Port City Java 701 North Carolina Ave SE #1, Washington, DC 20003    

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 crc_logo  Weekly SAW Sign-Up  Let us know if you'll be rowing or coxing each week

 

LaunchDOT Coach's Practice Plan  The workout for this weekend.

 

oarDOT  Post-practice Summaries & Photos How practice went each week      

                         

Shannon SAW Coxing Guidelines   How you are a part of coxing for the SAW program  

 

glossaryDOT Rowing Terminology  Rowing terms and commands to orient the novice and entertain the master

 

USRSafety.jpg 

 US Rowing Safety video  Required viewing for all rowers

  

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speakerDOTANNOUNCEMENTS: 

crc_logoarrow Our first practice of the year will be Sunday, March 29, 2015 

   SAW workouts start at 7:00 AM.  Please arrive by 6:55. 

arrow Take Out Day is Saturday, March 14,10am to 2pm All hands on deck!  Followed by a club-wide mtg to vote on updated bylaws, AND the Safety presentation.  

arrow SAW Season Kick Off Breakfast, Sunday, April 12 -  Let's meet at Tunnicliffs after practice.

arrow View Capital Rowing's calendar showing club activities and races 

arrow View the Capital Juniors rowing ad  Created by our cox Shannon as a project. Great job!

  

ACBA Bioswale Work Session: Sunday, April 29, 11-2pm

Bioswale Work Sessions happen on the LAST Sunday of the month.

EarthDay

Click here for current information and Sign-up

grasses

 

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LaunchDOT Coach's Practice Plan 

 Past Plans: [Spring/Summer/Fall 2011]    [Spring/Summer/Fall 2012]    [Spring/Summer/Fall 2013

"I can teach 90% of the rowing stroke in ten minutes. The other 10% will require you a lifetime of effort to learn."  -- Coach Robert Valerian

2014 Spring Seasonrowman 

March & April  WORKOUTS

 Sunday 3/30       Coaches Kelley & Gretchen         Season Kick off
   First, burrrrrrrrr. I can’t predict the future but I expect it will be cold Sunday morning to start the 2014 season of SAW. But, there’s nothing like 30 degree temps to wake you up at 7am.

    Second, one thing I want to make sure we nip in the bud this year is coming to practice 5 or 10 minutes late. Like my dad always says, if you’re not 5 minutes early, you’re already late. Try to be prompt so that way when we make practice line ups, we are set and coaches know what we’re dealing with.

     Third, if you haven’t watched the safety video yet, please do. It will start at 6:45 and run to about 7:15, just in time for the coaches to go over a few things and the practice for the day. For the people who don’t need to watch the video, bring down oars and start stretching.

When we are done stretching and with the video, we will do a brief overview of bringing the boats in and out of the racks/ off rollers, as well as using the lifts. If we are not careful when we do this, boats can not only get scratched, but dented or get a hole in it. This happened a couple times last year and put one boat out of commission for a while, so this is always good to review.

Once we get on the water, we won’t do anything crazy, just a few strokes by eight at a 30 to get loose and back into the swing of things. Kidding of course, though we will spend time getting comfortable in the boats again. We will spend most of the time rowing by four at full slide at an 18, rotating pairs every 15 strokes so people won’t be sitting out too long. Aside from the warm up, we’ll add in pick drill positions throughout the steady state at an 18.

Warm Up: Pick drill by four, starting with stern four, and rotating by pairs every 15 strokes. Only move onto the next position after we’ve rotated by pairs back to stern four. As a note to all coxswains, please start the warm up after the Pennsylvania bridge. Lets shove off the dock, pick it up by pairs, do a couple rotations through the bridge, and once on the other side, drop down to the pick drill (but don’t way enough to do so either). This will be for all SAW practices, and the reason is because I don’t want to have athletes warm up for 5 minutes while another group sits cold, and then have the warmed up four rotate out for 5 minutes and get cold, while the next four gets warm. Let’s keep the pairs rolling so no one sits too long.

The positions will be:

·         Arms only

·         Arms and body

·         ¼ slide

·         ½ slide

·         ¾ slide – this one I have not had us do regularly, but we will start including it. For those who race or will be with us during racing starts at practice, we do ¾ slide strokes, so moving forward, we will make sure to include them in our practices regularly. For those who are not too familiar with ¾, it’s about 1 or 2 rotations of the wheels from full slide – our heels are right on the verge of coming up off the foot stretchers and our shins are not quite perpendicular to the water yet.

·         Full slide. Full slide will be at an 18 on the square.

Steady State/ Drill: As noted above, we will spend most of the time getting comfortable in the boat, and actually repeating pick drill positions throughout the steady state. However, when we move onto doing it for the drill, we’ll only do one position at a time. This means 5-10 strokes normal at full slide, followed by 10 strokes at a given position, such as arms only, followed by 5-10 strokes back at full at 18 spm. Once back on full slide strokes, we’ll rotate pairs. What we’re looking for here is to emphasize separation right away on the recovery– making sure the arms lead, followed by the body and then the legs – on the drills, as well as proper body support. Then incorporate this into our regular strokes.

 

 Sunday 4/6          Coaches Bob & Kelley

 For today’s practice, we will focus on making the movement of our arms and bodies as streamlined as possible by incorporating a few different drills – with outside-arm-only rowing and a pause at the finish (yes, blade buried). As we move to outside-arm-only strokes, nothing changes from our warm-up. We still maintain the body support. The removal of the inside hand however, will force us to focus on the control of the outside arm over the oar. Any excessive movement with the outside arm, shoulder or body can cause the blade to either hit the water or sky before we catch – which can be the result of loss of body support or leaning away at the catch. To keep the recovery smooth, I want everyone to focus on keeping the outside shoulder up, and stretching for the inside knee as we move to the catch. 

And to note, a control catch that isn’t deep, will provide us a better opportunity to finish in at the proper height with the handle (middle of the ribs, below the chest), and get a clean down and away release – and that’s down and away together, not down then away. If we dig too deep or miss these points, we’ll most likely be aggressive with our finishes – tightening shoulders, leaning away to get the blade out or pull into our hip, or all three. Yeeeesh. One way to help is make sure we keep the outside elbow up – away from the body. A diagram are just a few examples to highlight the positions we want our bodies to be in at the finish and the catch. 

Warm up: Extended warm up with pick drill by 4, rotating pairs back to stern four before making a change in position. Once finished with the warm up and back to full slide, we will take it on outside arm only. Make sure during this we are light with our catches – not digging past white tape – and if needed, take a look out at the oar to make sure we are not. 

Drill: By 4, rotating between 10 full slide strokes at an 18 and 10 pause strokes at the finish – literally – with the blade this buried. This means light pressure so we don’t get knocked over when we pause. What we are looking for is proper blade height into the body, wide outside elbow which helps give space for tapping out, and a down and away tap down after the row call. We will do this several times through. 

Workout: Once we spin, we’ll take it on a steady state at 18 spm, adding in by 6 on the square. 80 percent pressure – so we will be getting the heart rate up a little bit, feeling some fatigue which will require us to stay focused on our body support at the catch, blade depth, and finish position. We will incorporate outside arm rowing on the steady state. If we are moving fairly well together, we may even consider bringing the rating up to a 20 and see if we can get a little more out of our legs without changing our body positioning. 

 shoulderUP

Sunday 4/13          Coaches  Steve  &  Ginger

            In Week 3 we’ll add in the feather. When we add in the feather though, it will be gradual rather than just going right on the feather. This will help avoid unneeded break down of the outside arm, which can happen if we also breakdown the outside wrist to feather. And ideally, as we take the stroke on the feather, we’ll have minimal to no tap down as compared to the square.     In a way, the motion of the hands on the recovery on the square, as well on the feather, is in a similar shape of a shallow spoon. The hands come down and away while feathering, hitting the lowest point as we swing out the body, and we gradually start raising them into the front end. The gradual raise is to help ensure that we do not lower the hands into the catch, sky the blade, and miss the catch – meaning we drive before we have the blade fully anchored in. In addition, keeping the blade close to the water helps keep the boat stable and from rocking back and forth. Dips in hands can offset the balance of the boat and cause it to crash on a side into the catch.

Note: The tap down is a controlled down and away motion that happens all at once.  It’s a rounded out motion as opposed to a square that brings the handle into the lap, then away. No THEN, but AND. In the picture, follow the purple dashed line to the catch, and green line back to the finish.  Position 1 is high finish. 2 is the lowest point in the recovery and from there our hands rise back into the front end to position 3.

Note 2: It will also be important to make sure that when we feather, we do not change our handle heights. When we are two inches above the water on the square, when we feather we don’t change the hands and the blade is now 6 inches above the water. This is important because people like to use those extra inches to carry their hands higher on the recovery, but when they square the blade back up, the blade squares into the water. That’s not good.

Warm up: Pick drill by 4, followed by 10 outside arm only strokes, 10 normal and then rotate to emphasize light catches to help with light finishes.

Drill: Various pauses on the feather with a flat outside hand. We will start by fours and then move to sixes. Especially by six, we will need lots of control at our pause positions. If we don’t have the control, the boat will rock around, especially at the 3/4 pause on the square. We also need to make sure that before we feather, we tap the blade out first, so it comes out square and we don’t risk feathering under the water.

When we start the drills, we’ll start on the square until we do the first series of the pauses. From there, we’ll stay on the feather.

Rotations will be:

·     10 normal on the feather, 10 pauses at the tap down paused at the square, and on the row call feathering the blade.

·     10 normal on the feather, 10 pauses at 3/4 slide on the square, and on the row call, emphasize early roll up before we get to full slide.

Workout: 2 min on/ 1 min “off” by 6 at various ratings, with off strokes at 18 spm at 60% pressure – not paddle. The on strokes will be at full pressure, and the off strokes at 60% to help build endurance.

 motion of the hands

 Sunday 4/20        Coaches  Bob & Kelley    

      We’ll continue to focus on our finishes and feathers, to ensure that we are able to come into the finishes at the proper height before tapping down and feathering. Often times, if we try to rush the finish, we will end up finishing into out hips/ laps and if we try to do this on the feather, we have nowhere to go with the hands except across the legs. When this happens, we may have a tendency to get the blades caught at the finish because if we can’t tap down to get the blade out, we’ll end up feathering under the water and then feel a massive amount of drag when trying to come out of the finish.

Not good. Not good at all, as that not only impacts a single rower’s stroke, but also can offset the balance of the boat. The side the gets caught, say port, drags the boat down to port and once the blade pops out, the boat may shoot over to starboard, but then recoil back to port. So it’s possible due to missing our finishes, a boat may rock around 2 or 3 times in a single recovery. Woof.

Warm up: Pick drill by 4, followed by full slide strokes on the feather with the pauses we included for the drills last week.

Rotations will be:

·         10 normal on the feather, 10 pauses at the tap down paused at the square, and on the row call feathering the blade.

·         10 normal on the feather, 10 pauses at 3/4 slide on the square, and on the row call, emphasize early roll up before we get to full slide.

The pauses are in the square to help us make sure we come out square before we feather, and go in square before we catch. It will also be important to maintain a minimal down at away movement of the hands on the release into the pause. We don’t want violent tap downs that have our outside elbow breaking down or our handles being thrown into our laps. Keep it smooth. Keep it refined. Keep it linear.

Drill: Cut the cake by 4, rotating 10 full with 10 cut, back to full and rotating pairs. With cut the cake, we will go swing air stroke to arms and body over, full stroke, swing air stroke – which some consider cutting the cake every stroke. With these strokes we don’t have to worry about tapping down, so we can focus on the height of our hands at the tap down and release. We can also focus on body support into the finish and next recovery, as well as swing timing together with the body, and then a controlled recovery once the legs take over.

If we’re moving well together on the cut the cake, we will also take it up to 6.

And for anyone unfamiliar with cut the cake, here is a video to review (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3A3uRfNfnI). The swing out of the finish is a little slower than what we will be doing cause we want to hold onto the momentum we build on the drive to carry us through the release, but the motion is the same.

Workout: 35 min rating pyramid with rating changes every 5 minutes – 16, 18, 20, 22, 20, 18, 16. We will do this by 6, but we will not hesitate to bring it down to 4 if the control/ timing is not there, and our focus on the finish and front end disappear. We will rotate pairs every 15 – 20 strokes. We may also include cut the cake in these strokes, as well as adding in by 8. But we need to be moving well with one another.

 Sunday 4/27        Coaches  Bob, Gretchen  & Nhat      

      So I’ve been in the mood to just have us row, with minimal drills the past couple of days. It worked, as in people really enjoyed it on Thursday and we got a lot of solid strokes in. I’m wanting us to to the same for SAW this weekend as well. 

Warm up: We’ll move from doing the pick drill by four to by six. When we do, we will do just a couple rotations of pairs per position, before moving to the next position. So no need to rotate all the way back through the starting six. 

We can weigh enough by the stadium to quickly check handle heights and make any changes we need.

Drill/ Workout: From there on, we’ll pick it up by six for a steady state at 20 SPM at 80 percent pressure. Every few minutes, at the coach’s discretion, we’ll take it on a pause position, such as arms away, body over, or half slide. 

The pauses will give us several opportunities to focus on separation, body positioning, slide control, and ratio between the drive and the recovery. 

Depending on how well coaches are able to keep boats together, length of pause positions may change. But ideally, 10-15 pause strokes before going back to normal. 

From where we spin, which I expect to be the Titanic memorial, we’ll pick it back up by six at 20 SPM, continuing with pauses. However, if were are moving well together, we’ll start adding in by eight. Most likely we’ll go 20 strokes by eight, 20 by six. As we progress and if we are moving well, we’ll lengthen out our segments by eight to 30 and 10, 40 and 10 and so on. 

We may even bring the rating up here and there to see how well we are able to maintain ratio, separation and body control. 

So all this said, we should be getting lots and lots of strokes in for a solid workout on the water.   

 

May  WORKOUTS

 Sunday 5/4       Coaches Dorene & Silky

       With two weeks until the scrimmage (May 17th from 4-6pm and I’m expecting SAW rowers to take part) and a month before our first race (June 1st – Stonewall at our boathouse), I want us to start incorporating racing starts into our practices. This means what we will be doing with our racing starts moving forward is practicing them on the fly, incorporate them into the starts of our steady states, and then try them in our piece work. So for example, any steady state we do, and any time we spin on a steady state, we’ll start with a low rating, low pressure racing start sequence. This means if we are at 22 SPM for a steady state, we are doing a racing start into that rating, and what we are not doing is a racing start to a 30 and then trying haphazardly to settle to a 22.

For our racing starts, the sequence will be starting from three-quarter slide (just like we have been starting our strokes at) and the first three strokes will have a shortened lay back which will help accelerate the rating. Below is a description of each stroke, though we will not be executing ours at this pressure right away on Sunday – that will be gradual throughout our practices.

·         Three-quarters  – Heels are flat on the foot stretcher – almost at full slide, body up tall. This is a 60% pressure pry stroke to lift the boat from dead water. There is also shortened lay back on this stroke – barely past vertical.

·         Half - 90 degree bend in the legs, a quick stroke that is about 75% pressure. Again, another pry stroke to build momentum in the boat. This is probably the hardest stroke to match between rowers, so follow the rhythm. Also minimal lay back.

·         Three-quarters - 90% pressure, another quick prying stroke. Also minimal lay back.

·         Lengthen - Here we are nearly at full but the idea is to find our length in our stroke into full slide strokes and start bringing our lay back in. Regular lay back.

·         Lengthen

Warm up: Pick drill by six and weigh enough before the stadium.

Drill: At dead water, we’ll make sure everyone is finding the right racing start positions by four. This means simply sitting with blades flat on the water at 3/4 slide, and 1/2, and 3/4 and lengthen, as well the finish with the shortened lay back for the 3/4, 1/2 and 3/4 slide strokes. On each of the positions, be sure to only move by mere inches from one position to the next, otherwise we risk lunging our body into the front end. For example, if we move from ½ to ¾, and come up too far at ¾ to properly hit the lengthen position, our legs won’t be able to go forward and we’ll push our bodies and shoulders into the front end. We don’t want that.

Workout: Steady state at 20 SPM, with pauses at shortened lay back finish, 1/2 slide, 3/4 slide and lengthen. Pauses will go in rotations of 15 normal strokes, 15 pause strokes, 15 normal and rotate. Steady state will be at 80 percent pressure. 

 Sunday 5/11          Coaches Steve & Rachel H

          Now we are only one weekend away from the scrimmage on May 17th, and with that in mind, we’re going to continue to focus on racing starts. Last week we went over the positions of the start – ¾ (shortened layback), ½ (shortened layback), ¾ (shortened layback), lengthen (normal layback) lengthen (normal layback) – through a series of pauses. From here, starting with our warm up, we’re going to continue to find those positions. And finding those positions is important to ensure that we are able to match up together, in time, during the starts of pieces during practice, and during races.

It is easy to get caught up in the idea that racing starts mean speed and high ratings, but that’s not always the case. Racing starts are about building the boat’s momentum, yes quickly, but also together so that the boat can reach its top speed within the first 20 strokes of a race. So that said, when we practice our starts during practice, we’re going to break them down and take them slow with low pressure and low rating. It will also be important to find proper body support and separation with racing start

The need for speed will wait.    jerry-maguire.jpg 

Warm up: Full slide strokes with pauses at racing start positions, rotating 15 normal strokes with 15 pauses strokes and back to normal. Pauses are: shortened lay back finish, 1/2 slide, 3/4 slide and lengthen.

Drill/Workout: By 6, we’ll break down the strokes doing three quarters first a few times, then gradually adding in subsequent strokes, and up to start five and 10s and settle strokes. After each sequence, we’ll let it run at arms away.

Our pressure and rating for these are going to be fairly light to start, starting around 50 percent pressure at 18 SPM – slow motion. We’re just looking to find the positioning and timing together before we try to get after it. And if we get after it, then we’ll start adding in pressure and ratings, as well as taking it up to 8.

And as for settle strokes mentioned two lines above, these will occur after the start five, and “high” ten sequence. The coxswain will call “settle in two…. One…..Two…” and together in one stroke we will make a rating change down from the high, to the settle in which we will maintain pressure but lengthen out our recovery to a rating that we would be able to hold for the body of the piece.

And for visual learners, here is an example of a racing to start that you can watch, review, and enjoy with popcorn. We won’t get this high however during our practice. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqFZRks9gOA 

Sunday 5/18          Coaches  Bob  & Silky, Nhat

       We are going to continue to incorporate racing starts as a focus into the practice since we do have a few people interested in racing in Stonewall (June 1), and we’ll probably have more people interested in racing as the season goes on.

However, one thing I also want us to focus on is making sure that we are light with our catches as we bring up pressure and ratings. Often times, rowers begin to dig deep by throwing their blades in at the catch to try to get more power, but this is actually has a negative impact on boats. It gives us less of a chance to get our blades out cleanly at the finish because we have to cover more distance at the finish, meaning we will most likely throw our hands into our laps forcefully to get the blade out. 

So to counter this, after our warm up, we’ll do a few rotations of outside arm only rowing until we are across from the stadium. And from there, we’ll do some dead water drills to check our handle heights at the catch and at the finish. 

Warm up: Regular pick drill by 6. We’ll do just two rotations per position before moving to the next to get through it a little quicker and gives us more time to do outside arm only when we are back to full slide. 

For outside arm only, 10-15 normal strokes, 10-15 outside arm only, and rotate when we go back to normal. When do the drill, focus on keeping the control of the oar in the outside hand, with minimal movements to catch and finish – don’t dig past the white tape. In addition, keep the outside elbow up and the wrist flat when coming through the finish. 

Drill: At dead water by the stadium, we’ll check our handle heights and do bounce drills at the finish and at the catch to continue to focus on the controlled movements on the recovery.

For the finish bounce drill, we will tap out of the water, onto the feather and pause at arms away, by four. When we do, we are looking for a controlled down and away motion that will help keep the boat balance on the release. No throwing down the handle into the hip.

For the catch, we’ll sit at ¾ slide with blades squared and out of the water, and on row, raise the hands up into the catch, as we come up the recovery, with a small controlled movement. Of course, not digging deep. 

Workout: After the drills, we’ll do a few racing starts at low pressure, low speed just to get the boats situated and finding the rhythm with one another. We’ll do the first 5 a few times through by 6, moving onto 5 and 10, and then moving onto by 8, before we enter our piece work. 

3 x 8 minute pieces, with racing starts and rating changes every two minutes. We’ll paddle for a minute and rest for 3 minutes.

•22, 24, 26, 24

•24, 26, 28, 26

•24, 26, 28, 28 

 Sunday 5/25        Coaches  Bob & Kelley    

For those racing at Stonewall, we’ll see if we can get the mixed 8 race line up together. If we’re missing a couple people, we’ll get as close as we can. 

In addition, we’re going to reduce our attention on racing starts, and continue to focus on smoothing out our strokes when they are at higher pressure and rating. This means the finishes and catches, in order to give the boat more balance and run (distance the boat travels between strokes) during the recovery. So the more pressure we have with a quick drive, and the more control we have with our body and legs, the better ratio we will have with a smoother recovery. And everyone loves a smooth recovery. 

And our practices are going to include drills that we’ve done in the first couple months of the season, but we want to make sure since we have done these drills in the past, we apply solid pressure to drill strokes in during practice.

Warm up: Pick drill by 6. Once back to full slide, we’ll take it to 10-15 pause strokes at arms and body over, rotating pairs on normal strokes, and focusing on the controlled and not aggressive finish and release of the hands.

Drill: Across from the stadium, we’ll check our finishes and catches with a few dead water drills by stern four and bow four. At the finish, starting squared and buried, we’ll tap and feather out to arms and body over on row, checking the release of the blade through the finish. We will then move to ¾ slide, with the blade squared and out of the water, and on row, coming up the slide and raising the hands up together, backing the blade in and stopping at full (don’t drive). We’ll do each about 5 times through before rotating fours.

From here we’ll take it on a rotation of cut the cake (normal stroke followed by arms and body only air stroke) every stroke for 10 to 15 strokes by 6, rotating on normal strokes. We’ll do this to focus on the clean, quick and fluid release of the hands out of the backend. 

And when we are on the drill, make sure we keep the pressure at about 75 percent so we are getting a solid stroke to give the boat momentum coming through the finish and release. 

Workout: 2 min on 2 min off for the remainder of practice. The 2 min on will be at a given rating (22 and above), while the 2 min off will be at 18 SPM at 50 percent pressure – meaning these are not paddle strokes, but firm strokes that will allow us to have a long stroke that is technically sound. We’ll do these by 6 to start, eventually moving to 8 if we’re moving well. In addition, each time we build into the 2 min on, we’ll do a racing start on the fly.

 Saturday 5/31        Coaches  Bob & Gretchen      

The practice plan for Saturday is actually two plans. One is for the 8s that are racing and one for the boats that are not racing. 

Stonewall Mixed 8:

Warm up: This will be our race day warm up: Pick drill by 6, and once back to full, we’ll add in by 8 at 18 SPM. Every 45-60 seconds, we’ll pump it up two beats until we reach the stadium. This should take us to a 24 or 26.


We will spin and begin racing starts on the other side.

Drill/ Workout: On the way to the start line, we will practice start fives, high tens, and settles by 8. The first few times, we’ll just do five and tens, at half pressure half speed – approximate highs of 24 and 26.

After this, we’ll bring the pressure and rating up to highs around a 30-32, and settling to 26-28.

Once we reach the start line, where we will practice pulling into a stake boat.

From here, we will simulate the 1,000m race by breaking it into four 250 meter segments/ approximately 1 minute pieces with 2-3 minute rest in between.

Segment 1: Start five, high ten (32 SPM) and settle to 26 SPM

Segment 2: Start five to 26 SPM (no settle)

Segment 3: Start five to 26 SPM (no settle)

Segment 4: Start five to 26 SPM for first 20 seconds then sprint for last 40 seconds brining rating to 28 SPM

Followed by cool down paddle.

Other SAW 8s:

Warm up: Pick drill by 6 followed by cut the cake until we reach the stadium. Rotation of cut the cake will be 10-15 drill strokes, 10-15 normal, then rotate. On these strokes, focus on the fluid and controlled release of the hands and body through the release. We don’t have to tap down or worry about feathering. We can focus on swinging controlled and together with supportive bodies.

Drill: Across from the stadium, we’ll check our finish heights/ with a few dead water drills by stern four and bow four – approximately five times each per four. At the finish, starting squared and buried, we’ll have a minimal down and away tap, and feather out to arms away, checking the release of the blade through the finish. We want to continue to focus on the controlled and fluid release of the hands and make sure we are not dropping our finishes into the body or our outside hip.

After both sets of four have done this five times through, we’ll repeat but extend the release to arms and body over on row. And if we can do the above dead water drills with minimal movement, we can transfer these movements to when we are actually taking strokes and have pressure on the blade.

Please note for the coxswains, just say “return” when we want to start over at the finish. No strokes during these dead water drills will be taken. 

Workout: 2 by 20 minute steady states at 75 percent pressure. 4 minute rest in between

Steady State 1: 20 SPM, first ten minutes by 6 with pauses at arms away every 10 to 15 strokes, then the last ten minutes by 8.

Steady State 2: 22 SPM, first ten minutes by 6 with pauses at arms and body away every 10 to 15 strokes, then the last ten minutes by 8.

 
Sunday 6/1 -  Stonewall Regatta at ACBA
Sunday 6/8     Coaches  Silky & Nhat       EOS Breakfast 9:15am

        For the next few weeks, we are going to work on finding a solid and quick leg drive that has some pop to it and lifts the boat, while maintaining separation and control on the recovery as the rating comes up. Both of these are important because they will help give the boat the momentum it needs to run out and carry us up the slide into the next catch. 

And if we can build the acceleration of the blade from the front end all the way through the finish, with stability in the body, we can have quick hands and body into the finish and through the release, and have an easier time bringing the rating up. If we don’t maintain the connection, the pop we try to find in the legs will be hard to come by.

So starting this week, we will begin the process of incorporating reverse pick drill positions. We will take is slow by breaking down the pick drill and focusing on specific positions. This week will be legs only, and we’ll drive from full slide to quarter slide, keeping the body and the arms forward. 

Here is a sample video of what the reverse pick drill can look like: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qthYo_8DZvQ

Warm up: Regular pick drill be 6, followed by cut the cake every 10-15 strokes until we reach the stadium. And as a note, be done with the pick drill by the 11th street bridge - two rotations per position before moving to the next. 

Drill: At the stadium from dead water, by stern four and then bow four, we’ll do full to legs down (quarter slide so be sure to not lock and pop your legs) drive five times through. Again, the focus is on letting the legs pick up the drive while the body hangs off the handle with a firm connection. 

When we do this, we will sit ready at full slide and on the row call, drive with light pressure from full to legs down, and tap out with control - keeping the arms and body forward - and we will pause for a second before we return and do it again. Be firm in the body but don’t be stiff, such as locked out with the arms, otherwise we will have a hard time getting the blade out. And on these, don’t worry about pressure so much.

This allows us to make sure we have proper body support, engage the drive with the legs, and lets the legs take the load of the drive. So when on the drill, our body swing won’t change, our arms will stay in front of us, and we only use the legs to drive down to quarter slide.

Workout: Steady state at 18 SPM by 6, rotating between full slide strokes and legs only. For each, we’ll to 10-15 normal, 10-15 legs only, back to normal and rotate pairs. AS we get going, we’ll be at 75 percent pressure - so a nice solid push - and make sure we carry this push into the legs only strokes. We want to focus again on have a firm and powerful drive. 

After several rotations of the drill and on the way back to the boathouse, we’ll stay at regular full slide strokes and every few minutes we’ll bring the rating up 2 beats. Rating changes will only happen if we’re moving well together and applying the rating change through the drive with a firm push of the legs. And the rating changes will be determined by the coaches and coxswains. We don’t want to go to 26 SPM if the 24 is not feeling well. We will also try by 8 if we are moving well. 

 

 

2014 Summer Seasonrowman

June WORKOUTS

 Sunday 6/15       Coaches  Bob and Megan      Puppy breakfast
Warm up: Pick drill by 6 followed by legs only rowing to build off of our drill work from last week. As a reminder, we want to let the legs take the drive off the front end, where the body and arms find the connection needed so that the handle and the legs move through the drive together. When we do the drill, keep the upper body and arms relaxed and when we tap out on the drive at arms and body over, don’t force it and make it violent. Keep it relaxed and fluid and you will have a much easier time getting the blade out of the water.

We’ll weigh enough by the stadium.

Drill: At dead water, by stern four then bow four, we will focus on a firm and quick leg drive, with connection by starting at full slide (blades squared and buried), and driving back to half slide only – so the legs will still be bent when we tap out. As we drive back to half, maintain the connection in the body so it hangs off the handle, and let the legs carry the body, arms and handle. And just like above, tap the blade out from the shoulders and the arms with firm but relaxed body support to get the blade out smoothly. We’ll return back to full slide and do it again.

This should be a quicker and more explosive push with the legs than on legs only. When we do this and the full to half slide drive on continuous strokes, it will be important to make sure the legs are picking up the drive. Our arms and body will stay forward, hanging off the handle.

Approximately five full to half slide drives per four, letting the boat run for a second before we return to full slide and buried with forward and supportive bodies.

Workout: Steady state by 6 at 18 SPM with half slide drive incorporated. When the boat has a bit of momentum behind it, it will be easier to find that quick pop right off the foot stretcher.

We’ll do 10-15 normal strokes at 75% pressure, with 10-15 half slide drive strokes. We’ll rotate on the normal strokes. On the normal strokes, try to maintain the pop and quickness we are looking for and hold the quick drive all the way through the finish.

We’ll eventually add in the legs only drive from last week/ the warm up, and then eventually drop the full to half slide drives and stay full slide at 18 SPM, with potential to go by 8 and bring the rating up.

And in case anyone missed it last week, here is a sample video of what the reverse pick drill can look like:

               http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qthYo_8DZvQ

 

 Sunday 6/22          Coaches   Bob and Dorene
           As a note to all SAW rowers, most of our boats will be on the trailer. I encourage everyone to show up about 15 minutes early to take a couple down (if we can access the endurance , garafalo and queen) and we will rig instead of stretch to help save time and get out on the water for our practice.

Warm up: Pick drill by 6 followed by first half drive rowing to build off of our drill work from last week.  If you recall, the first half drive is coming up to full slide, catching, and driving back only to the half slide position, then tapping the blade out of the water with the body and arms still forward. We are looking to find the drive with the legs, and the connection through the body and the arms so the handle moves at the same time as the legs do.

When we do the drill, keep the upper body and arms relaxed and when we tap out on the drive at arms and body over, don’t force it and make it violent. Keep it relaxed and fluid and you will have a much easier time getting the blade out of the water.

As we do the drill, we’ll do 10-15 first half drive strokes, then back to full and rotate on the full slide strokes. We’ll weigh enough by the stadium.

Drill: Just like the past two weeks, at dead water, by stern four then bow four, we will to focus on the connection of the body through the drive and letting the legs lead. We will start at full slide (blades squared and buried), and driving back to the layback position – so the arms will stay extended in front of us.  As we drive, maintain the connection in the body so it hangs off the handle, and let the legs build the momentum of the drive so the body doesn’t yank the handle when we layback. In addition, keep the body tall and support, as well as relaxed but firm so we can hold our connection through the backend. And just like above, tap the blade out from the shoulders and the arms with firm but relaxed body support to get the blade out smoothly. We’ll return back to full slide and do it again about five times through.

And like last week, and as noted above, when we did the full to half slide drive, it will be important to make sure the legs are picking up the drive. Our arms and body will connect, but stay forward, hanging off the handle when the legs drive.

To highlight the separation and connection we are looking for on the drive, here is a four coming through the backend of the stroke – legs down, arms forward, and body starting to take over:

backend1

And here is that same crew with an Olympic Gold Medal around their necks.

backend2

Workout: Steady state by 6 at 18 SPM with half slide drive incorporated. When the boat has a bit of momentum behind it, it will be easier to find that quick pop right off the foot stretcher. We’ll do 10-15 normal strokes at 75% pressure, with 10-15 full to layback strokes. We’ll rotate on the normal strokes. On the normal strokes, try to maintain the pop and quickness we are looking for and hold the quick drive all the way through the finish.

And like last week, we’ll eventually rotate in the legs only drive and the first half drive, and eventually drop all reverse positions.  Once back to full continuous strokes, we’ll bring it up by 8 and gradually increase the rating every couple of strokes.

Sunday 6/29         Coaches  Bob and Rachel H

Like last week, our boats will need to be rigged since all of them are racing on Saturday. We’ll need people to show up 15-20 minutes early to rig.

With Cap Sprints, our home regatta, right around the corner (July 12), I expect we’ll have a few SAW rowers participating. If you’re not, I highly encourage it since racing can be fun and a great learning experience if you have never it or don’t race too often. So that said, we’ll focus a little bit on racing starts to make sure we’re ready for the race.

Warm up: Standard pick drill by six, and into steady state strokes at an 18. We’ll pull the boats together and weigh enough by the stadium.

Drill: Racing starts.

Racing starts are done at the beginning of sprint races in an effort to hit maximum boat speed as early on in a race as possible. When done properly, the strokes during the race start lift and pry the boat out of the water and easily accelerates from dead water to top speed. When done improperly, strokes during racing starts can be chaotic, with oars missing water and the boat crashing side to side.

To make sure we know how to do race starts properly, and understand the positioning of the body, we will do them by fours to start, breaking down the strokes with light pressure and then add in people and pressure.

The sequence will be starting from three-quarter slide and the first three strokes will have a shortened layback which will help accelerate the rating:

Three-quarters (blades flat on the water, coach or coxswain will say square it up. Heels are flat on the foot stretcher – almost at full slide, body up tall. This is a 60% pressure pry stroke to lift the boat from dead water)

Half (90 degree bend in the legs, a quick stroke that is about 75% pressure. Again, another pry stroke to build momentum in the boat. This is probably the hardest stroke to match between rowers, so follow the rhythm)

Three-quarters (90% pressure, another quick prying stroke)

Lengthen (Here we are nearly at full but the idea is to find our length in our stroke into full slide strokes)

Lengthen

High 10 (Since the starts are quick strokes, the rating will jump easily and these high ten are quick strong strokes at an elevated rating)

Settle into race pace (Settling does not mean we take pressure off, but we drop our rating and find a longer recovery. The pressure and speed of the boat we built in the start and high ten, we hold on these strokes. So, we may do a high at a 34 and settle to a 28 for the body of the piece, but the pressure stays the same. We do the settle in two, and settle together)

We will start with three-quarters, half, three quarters, by stern four, then move onto bow four. Then once back to stern four, we’ll add on first five, then high ten – so 15 strokes total. Then onto bow four. Then eventually by 6 and eventually by 8. Over the course of these strokes, we’ll also increase pressure and rating.

An example of a racing start can be seen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqFZRks9gOA. You want to pay attention to the pressure they apply on the first few strokes to lift the boat and then they accelerate even more when the boat speed is hit.

Workout: As we are doing the starts, the starts will become the piece work. For example, a start 5, high 10, settle for 30-40 strokes will be approximately 2 to 3 minutes. We will repeat until we are done for the day.


July Practice WORKOUTS

 Sunday 7/6       Coaches Bob Brady & Megan Silk

CapSprints2014         With cap sprints next week, we will practice our race line ups. Or at least close to them. And we will do some practice 1,000m pieces to get ready. 

Warm up: Regular pick drill followed by rotations of cut the cake. We will do 10-15 normal strokes, 10-15 cut the cake. Back to normal and rotate. 

Drill/ workout: Like last week, we will practice a few rotations of racing starts by six or by pairs, at half pressure and half speed to find the proper body positions and to make sure we are matching up. 

From here, we will eventually add in pressure and increase rating, as well as add in by all 8 and all 4, to practice a couple race pieces. Ratings will be determined by how well the line ups are performing. 

Then a nice long cool down with rotations of cut the cake. 

 Sunday 7/13          Coaches  Bob and Megan

           For this week of practice, we’re going to take a lot of strokes with our feet out and resting on top of our shoes (Please don’t dig your heals into the shoes to hold yourself up). When we do this, the feet out rowing allows us (or forces us) to focus on several important aspects of rowing since we can no longer rely on our foot stretchers to hold us in and we can no longer pull on the shoes to bring us back up the recovery:

Feet Out  · Connection and stability at the finish – if we don’t have this (engaged and supportive core) coming through the finish, we could get knocked over.

   · Fluid release of the hands and body at the finish/ release – if we come in too aggressively with the arms or delay the release, we could get knocked over.

  · Control with the legs up the recovery – we won’t be able to pull ourselves up with the shoes along the recovery, which will force us to use our own momentum more, giving the boat less check and more run. Otherwise, we could get knocked out of the boat completely and left to suffer the Anacostia.

Warm up: Regular pick drill by 6 followed, with our feet out, followed by 10-15 stroke rotations of cut the cake to the stadium.

Drill/ Workout: With feet out, we will pick it up by 6 at 16 SPM, 75% pressure. We’ll rotate between full slide strokes and stokes with pauses at the finish, arms away and body over. Since we are adding these pauses and of course, staying at 75% pressure despite being feet out, we need to make sure that we have the support in the core and are not throwing are hands and bodies into the finish too aggressively or too far.

This is because we don’t want to fall over, and I don’t want anyone to fall in. But if you do, I will jump in for you… maybe.

We’ll do each pause about three times through, 15 strokes each, then back to normal and rotate on normal strokes.

We will eventually drop out the pauses and tie back in, staying at 16 SPM and bringing it up to all 8.

Sunday 7/20        Coaches     Bob Brady & Megan Silk

       We’re going to continue to emphasize the support we need at the back with by doing the warm up with our feet out, as well as focusing on the support we need with not only the body but also the outside arm at the finish. It may not seem like it, but keeping the outside elbow up provides several benefits for the finish and the release:

·     Provides extra support in the outside half of the body and prevents breaking down

·     Allows the handle to be pulled into the proper body position at the finish – middle of the ribs/ below the chest

·     Allows for the hands to come down and way with little movement at the appropriate height, and lead them into the catch. Otherwise we may drop the handle into the lap

·     Prevents extraneous movements and momentum from entering the boat and setting it off balance

·     Allows arms to come away faster through the release since no time is waster flapping the elbow into the body. This can help prevent people from trying to play catch up and feathering underneath the water before the blade is out

·     Helps prevent the outside hand/ wrist from breaking down for a double feather which can cause the blade to over feather and get caught on the water

So when you’re told to keep your elbow, it’s not just because it makes you look cooler, it actually allows for stronger, cleaner and more efficient rowing. Take a look at the diagrams below. In both, A represents the movements that you want. B represents the movements you don’t want. The red circles in each represent where you want your arms and body to be. Bigger circles are better because you have more space taken up.

A in both diagrams have ample space at their finishes with plenty of room to finish off the stroke, tap out, and bring the hands away cleaning. B in both diagrams do no because lack of proper body support and finish height.

Diagram 1  

 

         Click diagrams to view larger

 

Diagram 2

And in rowing, you want to take up space with the body, and never be tight within yourself. If you are, you’ll feel restricted and movements will be forced. The motion of rowing should be fluid with one positioning leading into the next, much like the water you row on. So we’re going to spend a few practices breaking down the outside arm and the inside arm.

Warm Up: Pick drill by 6 with our feet untied. Once back to full slide, we’ll take it on rotations of cut the cake for 10-15 strokes (emphasizing the stability in the finish and release), back to normal, and rotate the pairs. We will weigh enough at the stadium and tie in.

Drill: By stern four then bow four for five strokes each, we’ll start at the finish with blades buried and on row, take one low pressure full slide stroke and pause at the finish with the blade squared and buried. We are looking for the proper body positioning of the outside arm – elbow up and flat wrist. When we leave the blades buried, this will force us to hold the connection and stability in the body.

Workout: Once finished with the dead water drill, we’ll do builders at 20 SPM at full pressure and add in pairs every 20 strokes, eventually finishing off with 20 strokes by 8. On these strokes, the boat will feel heavy and we want to emphasize the connection we’re working on, as well as the wide outside elbow and keeping the outside wrist flat on the feather. Since we’ll have opportunities to take 20 strokes that are very stable, it will give us ample opportunity to focus on our body positioning at the finish without worrying about the set of the boat or blades scrapping across the water.

We’ll eventually stay continuous by 8. 

 Sunday 7/27    Coaches Dorene Haney & Megan Silk

A couple notes: the garafalo, Marie Louise, flight and asset are available. I think there will be two cox boxes available. For the garafalo, I think the collars on the oars are off on two of em on port and cause some pretty deep digging, so I would suggest using flight or spirit oars. 

Any questions, let me know. 

Warm up: Regular pick drill except with our feet out of the shoes. Like the past couple of weeks, we are looking to hold the support and connection in the last and core from the front end of the drive through the back end. However, if we collapse the body or breakdown and let our momentum hit the body and get behind us, we will feel like we will get pushed over ion the bow or have trouble coming away in time on bathe release.

Once back to full slide we will take it on 10-15 stroke rotations of cut the cake, then rotating on the normal strokes. We will weigh enough and tie near the stadium.

Drill/ Workout: We are going to do 2 x 20 minute pieces. The first 10 minutes of each piece will be at 20 SPM with pauses every 10-15 strokes by 6. The next ten minutes will be continuous by 8. After each piece we will weight enough and take a 4 minute rest. 

Piece 1: For the first 10 minutes, pauses will be at the feather position on the release. Again, 10-15 pause strokes, back to normal and rotate on normal strokes. At 10 minutes in, we will take it up to 8, and let's bring it up to 22 SPM and at five minutes left we will take it up to 24 SPM. 

Piece 2: for the first 10 minutes, we will pause at arms and body over, every 10-15 strokes. At 10 minutes in we will take it up to 8 at 24 SPM, and then at five minutes left we will take it to 26 SPM. 

After the last 20 minute piece, we will paddle by 6 to cool down.  

 

August Practice WORKOUTS

 Sunday 8/3       Coaches Bob Brady & Megan Silk

         We are going to pick it up right where we left off last week with our pause work, and also build some endurance in our strokes as the sprint season winds down and head season approaches. We won't cut out sprint work completely, but the focus will begin to shift to longer piece work that will get us lots of strokes in. 

Warm up: For our warm up, we are going to do the pauses from last week – at the feather and arms and body over – 10-15 stroke rotations and 3 times through for each position. Once completed we will stay at full slide to the stadium.

Drill: At the stadium, by four, four to five dead water full slide strokes starting at the finish, and pausing at the finish to focus on the connection and the back end.

Workout: 3 x 12 min pieces with gradual rating increase every 3 minutes. We will also start the first 6 minutes of each piece by 6 (or pairs) to find the timing and pressure with one another. After six minutes we will take it up to 8 (or four). Each piece will be followed by a 30 second paddle and 2 minute break. 

Ratings for the pieces:

Piece one: 20, 22, 24, 26

Piece two: 22, 24, 26, 28

Piece three: 24, 26, 28, 30

Nice long cool down to follow, ideally. 

 Sunday 8/10          Coaches Bob Brady & Megan Silk
 We will continue to get plenty of strokes in as the seasons transition from summer to fall. And who doesn't love more and more strokes.

Warm up: Regular pick drill followed by the a pause at the tap down/ feather. 

Drill/ Workout: From the stadium we will pick it up at full slide at 18 SPM at 80 percent pressure by 6, with pauses included every 10-15 strokes. Pauses will first be at arms and body over, followed by half slide. During the pauses, focus on raising those hands into the front end, so we are backing the blade in before we get to full slide.

In addition, also focus on a gradual roll up of the feather. After the row call at arms and body, ease up the slide with the legs and give ourselves ample time for a gradual roll up that starts as soon as the legs move, and we become square at three-quarters – before we attempt to catch. At half slide, we’ll be partially squared.

We’ll take this for a while, until we spin. We’ll drop out the pauses, gradually increase the rating on the way back and move to all 8.

Sunday 8/17             Coach  Dorene   

Warm up: Instead of the pick drill, we are going to do the pauses from last week - arms and body over, then half slide. We'll do 10-15 regular slide strokes and 10-15 strokes of each pauses, then back to normal and rotate on normal strokes. We'll do each pause 3 times though, then stay steady at 18 SPM to the stadium. 
 
With these pauses, just like last week, the focus will continue to be on raising the hands into the front end and gradually inching the blade in before we get to full slide.

We also want to focus on the gradual roll up of the feather, and not waiting to get the blade squared. If we wait, there just isn't enough time to square, finish hitting full slide, catch, and then drive - we will end up doing several things, including missing water and losing the stability of the boat. These are often caused by dropping of the hands either as we square or as we come up to full slide and drop our body support

So after the row call at arms and body, ease up the slide with the legs and give ourselves ample time for a gradual roll up that starts as soon as the legs move, and we become square at three-quarters – before we attempt to catch. At half slide, we’ll be partially squared.

And for a side by side comparison of what hands up and blades close to the water looks like, vs. hands droppings and blades skying, please look at the two images below. Image 1 is with supportive positioning and blades close to the water while Image 2 is loss of body support and blades getting away from the water.       

image51

image 

Drills: There are no drills for today. Just lots of strokes following the warm up. 

Workout: 2 x 20 minute pieces. The first 10 minutes of each piece will be by six. The second 10 minutes will be continuous by eight, and we will bring it up two beats from where we were. I want us to have an opportunity to hammer home the body and arm positioning, stroke after stroke after stroke after stroke without any pauses by six. Then we take it up to eight to find that same positioning stroke after stroke after stroke. 4 minute rest in between pieces. 

Piece 1: First 10 minutes with 10-15 stroke rotations with pause at half slide. Second 10 minutes at 20 SPM at 80% pressure.

Piece 2: First 10 minutes with 10-15 stroke rotations with pause at three-quarter slide. Second 10 minutes at 22 SPM at 80% pressure.

 Sunday 8/24       Coaches  Bob Brady & Megan Silk

Warm up:  Like last week, we are going to do the pauses for the warm up - arms and body over, then half slide. We'll do 10-15 regular slide strokes and 10-15 strokes of each pauses, then back to normal and rotate on normal strokes. We'll do each pause 3 times though, then stay steady at 18 SPM to the stadium.

Drill/ Workout: With a continued emphasis on raising the hands into the front end, we're also going to break down what arm that movement comes from, as well as what arm controls the feather and square. This means we will be doing drill rotations of outside arm only - which controls the placement of the blade through the finish and up through the recovery to full slide - and drill rotations of inside arms rowing with flat outside hand - which will emphasize the control the inside hand has on the feather and square, and allow the outside elbow to stay up and supportive, with a flat outside wrist.

So from the stadium we will pick it up on a steady state by six at 20 SPM with 10-15 stroke rotations of:

Outside arm only on the square: Focus on the control of the outside arm, as well as the control it has for dropping the blade in the water. Often times the inside arms brings with it a more aggressive catch than what’s needed.

Flat outside hand on the square: Let the inside arms work a little here, while the outside palm rests on top of the handle with the fingers extended, even when we are on the drive. We want to avoid breaking down the outside arm at the finish and through the release. If we do, it’s a wasted motion.

Flat outside hand on the feather: Same as above, but on the feather we need to pay attention to the outside arm and make sure it stays supportive through the finish.

We will do each drill segment two times through, and once complete, we will drop the drills and gradually bring the rating up from the 20 on the way back, and add in by 8.

Stay around for the End Of Season Breakfast @the Boathouse 

 

2014 Fall Seasonrowman 

September Practice WORKOUTS

 Sunday 8/31            Coaches Bob and Megan Silk

          Like last week, we're going to continue to focus on the control of the outside and inside arms. In doing so, we are going to change our warm up to rotations of outside arm only, inside arm with flat outside hand on the square, and inside arm with flat outside hand on the feather. These drills will help us with the forthcoming effort in how we think about the catch. 

I want boats to start thinking about the catch in different terms; specifically that the catch is not a position in the stroke, but rather a motion of a stroke that leads into another. This idea is being emphasized to help rowers avoid pausing at full slide, which leads rowers to hang the blade above the water, then catch, then drive. This stop and go positioning hinders the rhythm of the rowers in the boat, throws of catch timing, and causes rush – all things we don’t like. 

So what I want us to do, is lose the hang, lose the “then catch,” and lose the “then drive.” Start thinking of the catch as a motion that starts as soon as we begin coming up the recovery with the legs, with the hands raising into the front end as we begin our square, and once we are squared at three-quarter slide, finish the recovery with the catch.

Each motion of stroke leads into the next without any pause or delay of the catch, and of course, the motion of the catch leads into the drive.Overall, this will help make the stroke feel a bit more fluid and relaxed, and less forced or tense. 

And to emphasize this even more, below is a link to close up video of the body positions leading into the next in regular speed, followed by slow motion. You should be able to see that the arms lead into the body, body leads into legs, and the arms on the recovery lead into the catch, and there is no delay between any of motions. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T19a0bRzp1Q

Warm up: We’ll do 10-15 stroke rotations of outside arm only, inside hand with flat outside hand on the square, and inside hand with flat outside hand on the feather. 

Drill/ Workout: 2 x 20 minute pieces, with the first 10 minutes of each piece by six with drills from warm up incorporated. Three minute break in between. 

Piece 1: 22 SPM for first 10 minutes with 10-15 stroke rotations of outside arm only, then 24 SPM by all eight with regular strokes. 

Piece 2: 22 SPM for first 10 minutes with 10-15 stroke rotation of flat outside arm, then 24 SPM by all eight with regular strokes.

Sunday 9/7        Coaches Bob Brady and Megan Silk
           We will continue to emphasize the need to think of the catch as a motion within the stroke and not a position. This through encompasses all the drills we’ve been doing recently, such as the gradual roll up of the square, the gradual raise of the hands into the front end, and the control of the outside arm versus the inside arm during the recovery and the stroke. All aspects are important because we need to make sure we don’t hit the full slide, pause or hang with the blade, start the drive with the legs, and as a result, miss water that we could have used to send the boat further each stroke.

So it’s important to make sure that when we do the gradual raise of the hands and we have the square of the blade along the recovery, we finish the square which leads directly into the catch, which directly leads into the drive.

Warm up: By six at 18 SPM, two rotations each of:

·         Outside arm only on the square

·         Inside arm with flat outside hand on the square

·         Inside arm with flat outside hand on the feather

The rotations will be 15-20 strokes each, with regular strokes on the feather in between. Once through the drills, we’ll take it up to the stadium.

No drills for today. Just lots of strokes.

Workout: 2 min on X 1 min off. On strokes will be full pressure at various ratings between a 20 SPM and 30+ SPM, and off strokes will be 50 percent pressure at 18 SPM.

Notes for workout:

·         We will start with the minutes on.

·         We will start by 6 for a couple rotations.

·         Coaches/ coxswains will determine on rating strokes based on how the boats feel.

·         On strokes will be called within the last 10 seconds of the off strokes.

 

Sunday 9/14          Coaches  Bob Brady and Gretchen Abell

Warm up: Regular pick drill by 6. Once through the pick drill, we’ll take it up to pauses at half slide by 6, up to the stadium. Pauses will be 10-15 strokes, back to normal and rotate on normal strokes. 

Drill/ Workout: 2 x 24 minute pieces, with 2 minute rest in between. The pressure for these pieces will be full pressure of course. 

Piece 1: First 12 minutes by 6 at 22 SPM. The last 12 min we’ll take it up to a 24 by 8.

Piece 2: First 12 minutes by 6 at 24 SPM. The last 12 min we’ll take it up to a 26 by 8.

Following the last piece, we'll take it on a long cool down. 

 

 Sunday 9/21       Coaches  Bob Brady and Megan Silk

        This Sunday is the last Sunday before SAW takes part in its first head race of the fall season on Saturday at Head of the Anacostia. Then, SAW will take part in its second head race, Head of the Potomac, the very next day. 

To get ready for it, we'll practice our race line ups, or as close as we can to them on Sunday. We'll also make sure to get lots of strokes in to get us ready for the races. 

Warm up: Regular pick drill by six, and once through the warm up, we will take it up to 20 SPM by six to the stadium.

Drill/ Workout: From the stadium, we’ll continue by six at 20 SPM at 80 to 90 percent pressure - a nice solid pressure in which we can emphasize connection on the drive through the lats and the legs. 

Every couple rotations, we'll also take it on 10-15 stroke rotations of cut the cake to focus on our body support through the back end and the release, as well as our hands and body speed. This is to make sure we are swinging together out of the finish and coming up with the legs together - with a gradual roll up for the square, and gradual raise of the hands into the the catch. 

As the piece goes on after we spin, we’ll gradually drop out cut the cake, pump the rating up and take it to all eight. As we bring the rating up, make sure we are holding onto the body support and swing timing we had at the 20, as well as the pressure and connection on the drive. Fall races are obviously longer, and they require consistent pressure and technique, even when we get tired. 

Rating increases will be determined by the coaches and coxswains as the piece goes on. 

 

Sunday 9/28       Coach:     Megan Silk

         For this week, I want us to re-emphasize that the catch is not a position in the stroke, but rather a motion that leads into the drive. I think this idea has gotten away from us just a little bit over the past couple of weeks, and I think this is an important concept for new rowers joining SAW to starting thinking about. Because sometimes what happens, when we start thinking we need to get to full slide or we need to hurry about and catch to stay in time, some of us start to rush and end up stabbing the water and digging deep.

Don’t stab the water. It hasn’t done anything wrong. And in a fight, the water will always win.

So again, think of the catch as a motion that starts as soon as we begin coming up the recovery with the legs, with the hands raising into the front end as we begin our square, and once we are squared at three-quarter slide, finish the recovery with the catch by backing the blade it – not throwing it in to the water or stabbing the water. Each motion of stroke leads into the next without any pause or delay of the catch, and of course, the motion of the catch leads into the drive. Overall, this will help make the stroke feel a bit more fluid and relaxed, and less forced or tense.

Below is a video that I’ve shared before from U.S. rowing. Focus on the movement of the arms into the catch, as well as the square, catch and go of the blade. It looks effortless and very streamlined, as in they aren’t throwing their hands up and stabbing the water to catch. One motion leads into the next. This also makes the release of the blade through the finish much easier, as we don’t have to force the blade out.

If we are light with the catch, we can be light with the finish.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T19a0bRzp1Q

Warm up: Pick drill by 6 followed by 15 stroke rotations of cut the cake, up to the stadium at 18 SPM. On cut the cake, focus on the streamlined and fluid movements of the release of the arms and body. There should be minimal vertical movement. We want to keep the hands fairly level, just like in the above video.

Workout: To really feel the motion, we’re going to do some low rating pyramid work. From the stadium we’ll pick it up by 6 at 16 SPM at 75 percent pressure, with rating changes every 4 minutes. The pyramid will follow as: 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 22, 20, 18, 16.

During these strokes we’ll stay by six (or pairs in 4), and incorporate pauses at arms and body over, and at half slide. We’ll add the pauses in every couple of minutes. On the pauses, focus on the body support, the handle positioning and the blade positioning, and the gradual roll up of the blade that leads directly into the square, catch and drive.

We’ll eventually drop out the pauses and add in by 8 towards the end of practice.

 

 

October Practice WORKOUTS

 Saturday 10/4            Coaches Bob and Megan Silk
             Like last week, we’re going to continue to focus on the controlled motion of the catch, again emphasizing that the catch is not a position but a motion that needs to start being prepped throughout the recovery. This means a controlled roll up of the blade, getting the blade squared at ¾ slide, keeping the hands up and the blade close to the water on the square, and catch at 9/10 slide – before we actually hit full. This all begins when the legs begin to move along the recovery, and needs to be done along the recovery so we don’t wait and have to rush everything at full slide. There just isn’t enough time to do so.

Warm up: Pick drill by 6 followed by 15 stroke rotations of cut the cake, up to the stadium at 18 SPM. On cut the cake, focus on the streamlined and fluid movements of the release of the arms and body. We’re already feathered so streamlined motion should be easier to hold without a tap down. We want to carry this motion into our full slide strokes.

Drill: At the stadium, by four, we’ll start at the finish with the blades squared and buried. On “row” we will tap out nice and easy, and come up to full slide, dropping the blade in and pausing. We are looking for the smooth release, easy roll up, and early catch. We’ll do each four about five times through.

Drill/ Workout: From the stadium we will pick it up by six, at 18 SPM at 75 percent pressure. Every couple of rotations we’ll take it on outside arm only, and look to keep the outside arm in control of the oar and keeping the catch motion controlled without digging too deep, as well as pulling straight back on the handle. Then extend the support of the outside arm with a wide elbow and flat outside wrist, all the way through the back end.

We’ll gradually drop out the drill.

 

 Saturday 10/11        Coaches  Bob and Megan
 

Warm up: Like last week, we will do the pick drill by 6 followed by 15 stroke rotations of cut the cake, up to the stadium at 18 SPM. As we warm up, we're looking for streamlined and fluid movements of the release of the arms and body so we can release the hands together and swing the body out of the finish together. 

Drill: At the stadium, by four, we’ll start at the finish with the blades squared and buried. On “row” we will tap out nice and easy, and come up to full slide, dropping the blade in and pausing. We are looking for the smooth release, easy roll up, and early catch. We’ll do each four about five times through.

Workout: By 6 to start, we'll do 3 min on at full/ 1 min at 50 percent pressure. Ratings for the on strokes will be determined by the coaches and coxswains, but they are at full pressure whether or not they're at a 22, 26, or 44. The 50 percent pressure strokes will be at 18 SPM. We'll rotate pairs approximately every 15 strokes. 

For the shifts in pressure and rating, make sure we make consistent and controlled changes. This means finding the pressure through the drive with the legs - not yanking with the arms or body. This also means we're not going to change our catch positions or finish positions. Regardless of what pressure or rating we're at, the blade depth should remain the same, and the finish position shouldn't change. Stay connected and controlled throughout. 

 

Sunday 10/19         Coaches  Megan & Jennifer Schultz

 Warm up: Regular pick drill by 6, and once back to full slide, we’ll add in a few rotations of cut the cut between regular full slide strokes at 18 SPM.

Drill: Similar to last week but slightly different, we’ll start at the finish with the blades squared and buried. On “row” we will tap out nice and easy, and come up to full slide, dropping the blade in but instead of pausing at the catch, we’ll take a light pressure stroke and pause at the finish with the blades squared and buried. When we do this, we are still looking for that streamlined motion of the hands on the recovery and the drive, but when we pause with the blade buried, we’re forcing the core support in the body along with a supportive outside arm. We don’t want the support to break down or to get tense and fight the oar to prevent getting knocked over – so keep the pressure light.

We’ll do this drill about five times through between the bow four and stern four. Then we’ll get to work.

Workout: 2 x 16 minute pieces at pressure, with rating changes half way through each piece. There will be a five minute rest in between the two pieces, but this will include a 60 second paddle after the first piece and four minutes of complete rest.

Piece 1: First 8 minutes by 6 at 20 SPM; Second 8 minutes by 8 at 22 SPM.

Piece 2: First 8 minutes by 6 at 22 SPM; Second 8 minutes by 8 at 24 SPM.

Cool down: If we’re moving quickly, we should have plenty of time for a nice long cool down to flush out any lactic acid we may have built up and find our composure before hitting the dock. This cool down will include 10-15 stroke rotations of cut the cake.

 

 Saturday 10/25       Coaches  Bob Brady and Jon Clark

      For practice this week, we will focus on holding the support of the outside arm and the body as we come through the finish and feather. We want to make sure that we don’t lean away from our rigger at the finish, or slouch with the body, and we also want to make sure that the outside arm doesn’t breakdown by either swinging tight into the body or breaking down the wrist.

Overall, we want to stay tall, keep our core engaged, and the outside elbow away from the body, acting as if it’s an extension of the oar handle. This will help us avoid getting caught by our own momentum (which we will have an opportunity to experience), and finishing into our laps which results in a shorter and choppier finish.

Warm up: Regular pick drill by 6, and once back to full slide, we’ll add in a few 10-15 stroke rotations of pauses at the feather position. Focus on the inside hand making the movement to feather while the outside hand lets the handle turn within the palm, and the wrist stays flat.

Drill: At the stadium by four, we’ll start at the finish with the blades squared and buried. On “row” we will tap out nice and easy, and come up to full slide, dropping the blade in but instead of pausing at the catch, we’ll take a light pressure stroke and pause at the finish with the blades squared and buried. When we do this, we are still looking for that streamlined motion of the hands on the recovery and the drive, but when we pause with the blade buried, we’re forcing the core support in the body along with a supportive outside arm. We don’t want the support to break down or to get tense and fight the oar to prevent getting knocked over – so keep the pressure light.

We’ll do this drill about five times through between the bow four and stern four.

Workout: 2 x 12 minute pieces, with rating changes every 3 minutes. Pieces will be followed by a 60 second paddle and four minute rest.

Ratings will be based on how well boats are moving be approximate ratings will be:

Piece 1: 22, 24, 26, 24

Piece 2: 24, 26, 28, 28

Cool down: 18 SPM with the pause at the feather incorporated every 10-15 strokes.  

Saturday 11/1       Coaches  Bob and Megan
       If possible, we'll get the women's 8 that is racing out in their line up to find their stroke together.  With timing and equipment that's available, others will get their workout in the barges together.  In the barges we'll have a nice stable row and get really clean strokes in. This practice sequence will be modified depending on whether rowers are in the practicing W8+, the barges or the ergs.

Warm up:   We'll pick it on the pick drill, and following the pick drill, we'll take it on rotations of cut the cake for 15 strokes each up to the stadium.

Drill:  At the stadium by four, we’ll start at the finish with the blades squared and buried. On “row” we will tap out nice and easy, and come up to full slide, dropping the blade in but instead of pausing at the catch, we’ll take a light pressure stroke and pause at the finish with the blades squared and buried. When we do this, we are still looking for that streamlined motion of the hands on the recovery and the drive, but when we pause with the blade buried, we’re forcing the core support in the body along with a supportive outside arm. We don’t want the support to break down or to get tense and fight the oar to prevent getting knocked over – so keep the pressure light.

We’ll do this drill about five times through between the bow four and stern four.

Workout: From the stadium we'll pick it up on a steady state at 20 SPM by 8. Every couple of minutes we'll simulate the chute of a race. This means we'll take take 10 strokes to build to pressure and rating, such as a 26 or 28. Once we hit the rating, we'll stay their for 45 to 60 seconds, and lengthen back out to the 20. Then we'll repeat throughout the practice. 

 

Saturday,   November 8

 CRC PUT AWAY DAY!

All hands on deck!

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glossaryDOT  Rowing Terminology and Help     

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ACBA Boathouse Tour Information  Boathouse, grounds, river and shoreline info

 

CRC Rowing Glossary

Types of rowing, rowing commands, technique-related terms

 

Peterborough City Rowing Club

Good introduction to crew layouts and boat terminology

 

Introduction to Rowing 

Terms for Outside the Boat, Inside the Boat, Oars, and the Rowing Stroke, introductory guides

 

New Coxswains Guide at Coxie.com

Coxswain commands for getting the boat out, moving the boat, steering the boat

 

Coxing Dictionary at Coxie.com

Coxswain commands and definitions

 

Satellite view of the Anacostia, end to end     Click the image to enlarge & view bridge names

Anacostia_end_to_end.sm

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ANNOUNCEMENTS ARCHIVE:

 

CapSprints2014

 

arrowThe Capital Sprints  July 12, 2014   

 

Two SAW boats raced - a Mixed 8+ and a W4+.  More than 20 SAW members volunteers during the day.  GO SAW!!  

Mixed 8.1   womens 4.2womens 4.2

 

Gazette8

SAW program in the News!

July 2012 -  article about the SAW program ran in The Gazette in Montgomery County,  as well as The Fairfax County Times in Virginia.

 

Screen_shot_2012-05-13_at_3.53.30_PM

 

arrow Pix from the Capital Sprints, July 13, 2013  

 67926 10152031617782646 1259475274 n Mixed8.2013  1003703 10152032285767646 744594278 n 1010076 10152031618247646 1032178875 n

  

 

SAW racing, fall 2014...

 

SAW8HOTA2014

Head of the Anacostia, 9/27

Mx8+: Susie, Cate G, Jonathan, Paul,

Malcolm, Bruce, Mary E, Barbara

 Rowing2014CapSprints 

Head of the Potomac,9/28

Mx8+: Susie, Cate G, Malcolm, Paul,

Jonathan, Bruce, Barbara, Louise

W4+: Mary E, Peggy, Carmen, Mary P

SAW4OccoquanChallenge2014

Occoquan Challenge, 10/5

Mx4+: Emmie, Kate C, Jonathan, Andy S

OccoquanChase2014SAW

Occoquan Chase, 10/12

W4+: Leana S, Jamie, Cami, Jenny

Grp after 

Head of the Occoquan, 11/2

W8+: Mary E, Peggy, Carmen, Mary P,
Barbara, Jaimie, Kathy B, Louisa

 

 


ospreyarrow 
Where are the osprey?  Click OspreyTrax to follow our two South Capital St bridge residents' migrational journeys 

For the winter Ron settled in along the banks of the Brazillian Amazon River.  Ron started his trip home on 19 March and arrived back on the Anacostia on April 10. 

Rodney  wintered in Venezuela and returned to the Anacostia the day after Ron.  

Ron and Rodney, carry satellite tracking equipment that has allowed Dr. Rob Bierregaard of UNC, to track their migration patterns over this past winter.  

More on the Anacostia ospreys:    Video showing Ron and Rodney's capture and tagging

     Article in April 19 Washington Post                      Article in the March 16 Bay Journal   

 

 

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Novice Sweep rowing lessons are available all season.

 
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